Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

Evolved Mommy | October 23, 2014

Scroll to top

Top

10 Comments

Pitch, please! Let's get real about bloggers working with brands - Evolved Mommy

Pitch, please! Let’s get real about bloggers working with brands
Stephanie McCratic

Liz at CoolMomPicks broke it down in a very honest way today at Mom 2.0 (by the way, this is THE conference to attend if you’re a blogger)

Basically, there are three types of content you’ll get pitched: Editorial, Advertorial / Promotional, and Paid. It’s very important to know the difference and respond appropriately for the type of pitch.

Editorial vs. Advertorial vs. Paid Ads

What’s the different between the types of pitches we get from brands and PR agencies?

Editorial

This is a pitch from an agency or brand looking for ‘earned’ placements. (see: Types of PR: Earned, Owned, Paid). Liz was very direct and said,

“Please be flattered when you get these kinds of pitches because they’re treating you like mainstream media. You’re getting the same info that Glamor, TechCrunch and others are getting.”

Also, you have control over the content.

There’s no budget for paid content. Don’t pitch back.

The whole panel (representatives from Microsoft, Best Buy, Ogilvy & Lipi Taylor) were very gracious and open, emphasizing that they are real people, and if you are a jerk in your emails to them, they simply will not work with you.

I can enthusiastically agree. You should’ve seen some of the emails I got from bloggers when I was at Country Outfitter, angrily hammered out on a keyboard questioning why I had worked with so-and-so, but not them. For the most part, it was because I didn’t know about them.

“Now I know you. And I don’t like you very much,” I’d think.

Advertorial
i.e., sponsored post / ambassador / gift for review
You still have control over the content and you are getting paid or recieve a product in exchange for your words and access to your audience.

There’s budget for blogger projects here. What was interesting is that each of the panelists said they really love to get creative pitches back from bloggers that are more than just a sponsored post.

“Sometimes it’s easier to pitch a $5,000 creative campaign than a $50 sponsored post.” – Jeannine @ Ogilvy

Advertorial content is also called ‘promotional’ content and can include a giveaway for your audience.

Advertising
You have no control over the content.

This is a display ad (the rectangles make the most money, by the way).

Natalie from Microsoft did say that she immediately passes on blogs that have a header ad above their own blog header because that demonstrates priorities.

Noted.

The panelists agree that budgets for these types of campaigns come from different departments. Sometimes it’s marketing, sometimes it’s PR, sometimes it’s ‘found’ money. So just because a company advertises during the Super Bowl doesn’t mean there is budget for a blogger outreach campaign. However, a compelling creative campaign could be the key to unlock those dollars.

How to get better sponsorships

They also recommended making a list of your 10 dream brands. To find the right contact person search “{brand name} + press release”. The person who sent the press release or who is listed as the contact on it is probably your gal (or guy). Reach out directly and see where it goes. Can’t hurt.

Send them a 1-pager about your blog with stats and the interesting bits (niche, demographics, fun past projects, etc.) and then follow up.

What’s the best brand experience you’ve had? Or the worst? 

Comments

  1. I have been thinking I should have a header ad, now I think I will stick with the sidebar ads. Great info as always, thanks for sharing!!

    • I thought that was such a simple, but powerful thing for her to say. It makes total sense.

  2. Christina

    Great post Stephanie! When I represented a brand, one thing I really vetted out was making sure the blog fit our demographic as well as our company. My previous company was ultra conservative and some blogs just weren’t going to work. It wasn’t personal, just didn’t fit our brand. And girl….sometimes those bloggers just could not understand that in the end it boils down to ROI.

  3. This is awesome. thanks!!

  4. Thank you for sharing this information, Stephanie.

Submit a Comment

I know you have an opinion. Now share it.

Google